Hey NZ Bassist's

Welcome, Introduce yourself! Have any comments or ideas? It's your site, what do you want to see?
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mikericky
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Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by mikericky » Thu Aug 30, 2012 10:13 pm

Hi to you all on BassPlayer NZ,

Great to see a cool and well run local site for bass players in NZ, there is some good reading here and looks like an easy go'in vibe.

I don't have gear like a lot of you guys do but I'm keen on what I do have and like to see what other bass players are doing and playing.

First thing I did out of school was study sound engineering while playing bass and using home brew valve amps, nowadays its just amazing to see what has happened with micro electronics but the bass itself has not changed at anything like the same pace, my current goto bass is a 2001 MIM P, recently I fitted a set of Fender AVRI 57 pickups into after playing with the stock pickups for some time, sounds great, despite not a lot of love for these pickups with the raised A pole piece the sound I get is even across the strings, its deep, crisp and perfect for blues bass. Enough of that for now, cheers to you all.

Mike.

Mikelvis
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Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by Mikelvis » Sun Sep 09, 2012 11:14 pm

Hey Mike welcome to the forum, I'm Gaurav, I just joined it a few minutes ago and happened to have read your post, turns out we have a few things in common, I too would like to become a sound engineer and I just have a bass guitar and an amplifier, but sadly I don't have much knowledge on pick ups and stuff, I just play it, but it's interesting though, but anyway how long have you been playing the bass?

mikericky
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Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by mikericky » Mon Sep 10, 2012 1:32 pm

Hey Mikelvis - welcome to you as well, kinda funny isn't it - two new members welcome each other haha.

I have played bass on/off/on again since about 75 - wow that is a while ago to. Bass's have changed less I reckon than anything else. Its a great time to be learning bass really, what have you used to help things along ? the Hal Leonard (Ed Friedland) books+CD's are an excellent choice if you are looking for something to use while your looking for a band, you can get a jam going with the mix on the cd's, this really helps you lock into the drum beat, another really excellent resource is the studybass.com web site, if you can get your computer linked into your sounds then this site will take you from really simple root note bass lines to some more advanced stuff, best thing is if you don't have a band right now it will get you jamming with a mix of sorts and at appropriate playing speeds.

When I studied Audio systems the text books and almost all of the study schematics etc was on valve gear, the good thing was it took you through stage by stage, at work at that time the amps were full of IC's already (~early to mid 80's), sometimes a FET front end and some SS power transistors or whatever at the output stages and mixing desks were huge and transformers were everywhere, nowadays the gear is very cool - light and compact, well maybe not speakers.

So what sort of bass do you play ?

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john
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Location: wellington

Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by john » Mon Sep 10, 2012 3:12 pm

Welcome along guys :D

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pins
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Bands / Groups: Naked Gun (Covers),still just filling in on bass after 26 years.
Butt Scratch (Bus Crash) originals band.
Location: Napier

Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by pins » Mon Sep 10, 2012 6:59 pm

Hi,yet another P Bass to the fold,please post up some pics of your gear guys. :D

Mikelvis
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Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by Mikelvis » Tue Sep 11, 2012 1:34 am

Haha it is, it is, wow it's really been a while by now, yeah Hal Leonard have some good books, I downloaded a couple of books from the net and some videos as well, it has helped me but I am trying to battle my attitude of not enjoying simple and easy songs, I just want to run without crawling, because you see my mind is kinda set on the rigid mentality of the classical guitar (I play that, the acoustic, and the electric, with my left hand, my bass with my right hand), so I am too used to it being complex I guess, because I have been playing with my left hand for several years now so I guess my right hand is just "jealous" hahah, but when I practice I mainly focus on my techniques to help me get off the ground, Slapping & Popping, Double Stops, Barring, I try to play basslines that incorporate those techniques, but I seriously need to start playing songs that I like, and I play and listen to pretty much anything really, rock, jazz, blues, you name it, except the new mainstream rubbish, or heavy metal stuff, but when it comes to the bass I listen to Jaco Pastorius, Victor Wooten, Stanley Clarke, and I am still looking for more

Haha interesting, I remember watching videos of concerts from the 80's and everything was huge (I was only born in '93, wasn't around yet to have seen it myself), compared to today's equipment and I certainly hope you haven't fallen asleep from boredom hahah

mikericky
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Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by mikericky » Wed Sep 12, 2012 10:12 pm

Hi John and Chris, thanks for the Welcome - yes I will post pics in the 'show your bass' threads as soon as work gives me a break ... never rains but it pours. Cheers, Mike.

mikericky
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Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by mikericky » Wed Sep 12, 2012 10:18 pm

Hi Gaurav - wow sounds like your well onto it with your bass playing, I'm not so into playing the slapping and popping techniques myself but the range of what I listen to is as broad as most music and techniques, as a player I am more bass-ic - haha. Keep up the playing, must be some muso's nearby somewhere. Cheers, Mike.

Mikelvis
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Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by Mikelvis » Mon Sep 17, 2012 7:07 am

Hahahah Bass - ic that's a good one, that's cool, yeap just waiting for them, but if you don't mind me asking, which course need I pursue If I want to work with guitars, like making pick up's, amplifiers, I mean researching and experimenting with the sound, does it still fall under Sound Engineering?

mikericky
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Re: Hey NZ Bassist's

Post by mikericky » Wed Sep 19, 2012 10:48 pm

Sounds like you might be happy working in a music shop or with a Luthier perhaps, my background was self taught electronics which covered a wide range of everything from crystal set radios to my first bass guitar amp which was free cause it was broken when I got it, amps and electronics are something you gel with or not and nowadays its mostly untouchable internals anyway, to fix my first amp I had to draw a circuit diagram and work out how it all worked, it was a tube amp and had 5 valves, in the end I fixed it up with upgrades of new diodes replacing the dead rectifier tube and new plastic caps throughout replacing the old wax jobs and was also given a single 12" driver in a ported cab to use with my Diplomat Jazz bass copy, it seemed like that amp and cab were indestructible, at this time I started building distortion units for my gitard band mates using op amps and they sounded better than what you could buy or maybe better put what we could not afford, still at school - every Friday was music day, that meant spending the day off school in the city from one music shop to another playing whatever we could get away with off the shelf, I never learned much about the inner details off guitars and pickups etc but I got to know what a good setup was like and was all over the amps checking out what tubes they used and what it was like to play really nice bass's that were not affordable either.

I don't know what is available for you in terms of study courses but you have access to better study material than we did back before the Internet, I did a diploma course that was called "Audio Radio, Hi Fi and Sound Systems" and it covered amps, PA's, speakers systems and mixers as well as basic radio and some FM stereo, all very detailed stuff but very dated now, reading up about 'J' stacks and things the modern PA's are not built out of walls of sound the way they used to be, my advice is "google's your friend" and you must be able to find some on line study, hands on will be a case of finding local or being prepared to move maybe, there are some sections on the site here you could post in asking around to see how others have learnt stuff, also have a look at http://www.talkbass.com as well, heck buy a spare bass and pull it apart or buy a cheap kit and build one could be a good start! seen someone here ran a thread on that in the custom shop section, could be a way to learn some more, stay enthusiastic and have fun !

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