ear training

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nzbassplayer
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ear training

Post by nzbassplayer » Fri Nov 21, 2008 8:46 am

Visualise playing the notes (of a song, scale, etc) on the fret-board, while humming or singing the tune.

For each key, associate a single tune to that key. hum or sing it regularly.

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Re: ear training

Post by foal30 » Tue Nov 25, 2008 1:12 pm

yes, and this approach can help muchly with interval recognition.
as above pick a tune that relates to the interval.

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joppo
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Re: ear training

Post by joppo » Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:59 pm

This is something I really need to work on. Has anyone ever tried one of those 'learn perfect pitch' things you see advertised in American magazines?

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Re: ear training

Post by foal30 » Tue Nov 25, 2008 5:01 pm

For God's Sake no.

what is perfect pitch? and if such a concept is true why would a musician want it, it'll be the death knell, you could not work with anybody. I'd be banned from fretless for a starter!

I think interval recognition is the one, followed by knowing the chord when you hear it, which leads to diatonic chord function etc.

there is Ear Master program which I been told is cool but I think you should sit at the keys or sing or with the bass so you are hearing a musical instrument not a chime/blip.

even the Abersold playalongs, so you are hearing chords.

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Re: ear training

Post by foal30 » Tue Nov 25, 2008 5:11 pm

potential for Jazz fuckwittery here but I do not think the Bass Guitar is actually all that in tune in a construction sense.
somewhere in the dark recesses of this brain I am remembering
specific to 1st position, particularly 1st fret and nut height

how about Piano? does the brain "make up" the missing overtones/harmonics?
am I a nerd? :D

so , no I can't say I'd go perfect pitch but I am sure trying to improve my relative pitch awareness Joppo.

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Re: ear training

Post by beagle » Tue Nov 25, 2008 5:59 pm

I agree that relative pitch is what to try and develop.
Having played keys and knowing chords from that is a def advantage when it comes to hearing and recognising a particular chord, and therefore it's scale.
I find simple old scales really helpful for me.
Also playing scales in patterns like this one for example... (using notes in the scale) 1,8,2,1,3,2,4,3,5,4,6,5,7,6,8
And mixing up the keys, going up and down etc.
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Re: ear training

Post by nzbassplayer » Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:01 am

I used the perfect pitch course. A lot of talking and not much substance IMO.

Singing is the way to get a good ear.

A singer friend of mine can seat by the radio all day and transcribe without using an instrument for reference.

I dont know much of the science behind it, but Im sure it has something to do with associating pitch/intervals with something else.

For example:

When I tune my bass, I associate A 440 with the first note of "thats the way I want my rock and roll". works prefectly.

If you can remember a tune, you can remember pitch.

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Re: ear training

Post by joppo » Tue Dec 02, 2008 9:12 am

nzbassplayer wrote:Singing is the way to get a good ear.
Ha, if it involves singing, there's no hope for me... unless the tuning is flat! :lol:

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Re: ear training

Post by john » Tue Dec 02, 2008 9:16 am

LOL I hear you ................your a whole tone out :mrgreen:

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Re: ear training

Post by Pstewart » Tue Dec 02, 2008 11:08 am

So do i, i'm a great singer, i specialise in microtonal harmonies :P
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Re: ear training

Post by foal30 » Tue Dec 02, 2008 12:59 pm

er. It's all practice, just start with simple *BANNED* and go slowly.

I'm making some progress, but I started with things like "Over the Rainbow", "Michael row the boat", "Love Me Tender"
use the piano to help, it "May" be easier than the bass. maybe...

Hear it, say it , sing it, play it.
I think thats Jerry Jemmott's method and that MF is badder than the baddest thing from badtown.

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Re: ear training

Post by Chip » Sun Dec 07, 2008 2:09 pm

I dunno about the need for a perfect pitch as such. For mine, I worry about just working out the structure of a track. So for me, I will put it in a key in my head where I feel comfortable when playing (usually A I think) and just work out the specifics of the track. Then once that's down, when you come together with the group, it's just a matter of shifting it as required into the actual key of the song.

As one who has learnt mainly from ear, I would love to have utilised the resources available to me when I was younger and actually got the theory stuff sorted as well. But using ears has given me a chance to grow my playing in my own way which I guess has helped as well. When I am recording for other artists, I am a big fan of not touching the bass until very near to first rehearsal time. For some, I won't play the track until we get together. I will listen to the track for a few days to absorb not just the music but to try and personify the person's song/lyric so that when I do play, it is appropriate not just in note context but in the spirit of the track as well. With just listening, I can work out the changes of the track and sing along in my head where I see the bass part going, and then when I play with the greater group, because I haven't played the bass to it (or very minimally), I think it helps in capturing some of the array of options that pop into one's imagination. At times, I think going through and through a track one can tend to conservatise it, to essentially look for the patterns that they take into the track. By just leaving it to the ears and the imagination for a bit serves to open up fresh ideas when you come to actually play the track.

I also think open ended jams are great for the ears. After spending years doing gigs where literally a group of musicians would turn up, choose a key to start off with and then see where the next 45 mins took you all is a great way to expand your ear training. As the musical conversation grows, you then jump on ideas from what others are playing and it can serve not just to open up ideas to you that you may not have thought of, it teaches you and your ears to be able to move quickly and allow it to become second nature kinda playing.

What a rant, sorry!

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