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Re: BASS SOLOS

Posted: Wed May 27, 2009 1:55 pm
by ryla
yeah, maybe changing a 'part of the solo might be a good starting point, i usually like to incorporate a 'quote' in there if i can - and i need to think more about what the drummer is/is not doing in there and ask for something different to change the approach

Re: BASS SOLOS

Posted: Wed May 27, 2009 4:35 pm
by beagle
I think the frustrating thing about bass solos is the small amount of opportunities to do it live and practice it.
Guitarists and keyboardist hog all the spots don't you recon? :roll:

Re: BASS SOLOS

Posted: Fri Aug 14, 2009 11:42 pm
by red71
take a walking bassline and try to rythmicaly throw it around in a higher registar seems to work sometimes in jazz anyway...

Re: BASS SOLOS

Posted: Sat Sep 05, 2009 5:19 pm
by WindsorCravette
why sould it have a Bass solo if you don't even know what to do'??? ???
in my case my band accepts a solo (whatever the instrument) only when the instrumentalist is skillful and clever enough to compose an attractive and very! very! melodic! solo which we all could be proud of, and the audience would be greatful to listen to.

Music is all about your melodies, and if you don't have melodies you don't have songs.

Re: BASS SOLOS

Posted: Sat Sep 05, 2009 6:17 pm
by beagle
So you're saying soloing is about melodies... yeah true.
I've found that I improvise better when I vocalise the notes I'm playing.... which can apply to soloing or walking bass lines.
Guitarists call it 'scatting' I believe... I could be wrong of course.
I think it's just the way my brain is wired
Anyone else find that also?

Re: BASS SOLOS

Posted: Sat Sep 05, 2009 9:52 pm
by foal30
possibly
it's certainly an useful approach point

as is the melody plus idea
good rhythmic interest and repetition should not be overlooked

there is many ways of looking at soloing and the more options we have to us as players the better teh end result should be. hopefully

Re: BASS SOLOS

Posted: Sun Sep 06, 2009 5:23 pm
by WindsorCravette
beagle wrote:I've found that I improvise better when I vocalise the notes I'm playing.... which can apply to soloing or walking bass lines. Guitarists call it 'scatting' I believe...
You're right:
it's called ''Scatting'' and it's surely useful, very common among jazz musicians
it makes your brain work musically and your melodies flow with your brain, , , someway, somehow.